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Bathe Under the Sun
Feel Nature's Vibes
Bathe Under the Sun Feel Nature's Vibes

Historical Background

Taiwan's first forestry agency was established during the Qing Dynasty in 1873, but was soon dissolved. Taiwan was ceded to Japan after the Sino-Japanese War of 1895, and an Office of Agricultural Production, which was in charge of forestry matters, was established under the Japanese Governor General's Office.

With the return of Taiwan to China in October 1945, the authorities in Taiwan established the Office of Forestry Administration, under the Department of Agriculture and Forestry, in order to bear responsibility for forestry affairs. Taiwan was divided into ten Forestry Administration zones, and district forest management offices were established in Taipei, Luodong, Hsinchu, Taichung, Puli, Chiayi, Tainan, Kaohsiung, Taitung, and Hualien, some with branch offices. Four model logging stations and three forestry research and experiment institutes were also established.

In June 1947, in order to strengthen forestry management, the Taiwan Provincial Government dissolved the Office of Forestry Administration and reorganized it as the Forestry Administration Division. In September of the same year, forest management duties were transferred to the Department of Agriculture and Forestry, and the Division retained only afforestation and lumber production/supply affairs. in June 1948, forest management and model forest management duties were again returned to the Division, and in June 1949, the original ten Forestry District Offices were reduced to seven and transferred to county governments.

In November 1950, the seven Forestry District Offices were returned to the Division. In December 1952, employees of the defunct Taiwan Camphor Office were transferred to the Division. In October of 1958, Mt. Mugua Tree Farm in Huaiien County was transferred to the Division. The Division was reorganized on February 15, 1960, and renamed the Forestry Bureau. At that time the Bureau had six divisions, six offices, and a total of thirteen forestry district offices. In July 1973, the Aerial Survey Squad was placed under the Bureau's control and renamed the Aerial Survey Office. In September 1973, the Mugua Forestry District Office took over the Taiwan Chung Hsing Paper Corporation Lintienshan Forest. On January 1, 1974, the Dasyueshan Forestry Company became the Bureau's Dasyueshan Model Forest Management Office.

On July 1, 1989, the Bureau's status was changed from an "enterprise organization" to a "civil service agency" with a civil service budget. The original seven divisions and five offices containing 34 sections, plus 13 subordinate forestry district offices with 72 work stations, were reorganized as five divisions and three offices containing 27 sections, and eight subordinate forestry district offices with 34 ranger stations. The Alishan and Kenting forest recreation area management offices were dissolved, and their affairs assigned to the Chiayi and Pingtung Forestry District Offices. A new forest railroad section was established at the Chiayi Forestry District Office. The Aerial Survey Office remained unchanged.

Following the promulgation of the Provisional Statute for the Reorganization of Taiwan Provincial Government, on July 1, 1999 the Bureau was placed under the central government as the Forestry Bureau of the Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan. The Bureau was assigned the services of the Forestry and Conservation divisions of the Forestry Department, Council of Agriculture on January 30, 2004. This Bureau has borne responsibility for Taiwan's forestry matters for over sixty years, and accomplished its mission throughout each period. Today, traditional forestry work must be balanced against the needs of nature conservation. In this time of public awareness of the need for ecological protection, the Bureau is again evolving and assuming new responsibilities.
Visit counts:1110 Last updated on:2016-06-08